Get Your Free
Demo class

Book Now Chat With Us
Indian classical music

Indian classical music

Carnatic music

Purandara Dasa (1484–1564) was a Hindu composer and musicologist who lived in Hampi of the Vijayanagara Empire.[45][46] He is considered Pithamaha (literally, “grandfather”) of the Carnatic music. Purandara Dasa was a monk and a devotee of the Hindu god Krishna (Vishnu, Vittal avatar).[45] He systematised classical Indian music theory and developed exercises for musicians to learn and perfect their art. He travelled widely sharing and teaching his ideas, and influenced numerous South Indian and Maharashtra Bhakti movement musicians.[47] These exercises, his teachings about raga, and his systematic methodology called Suladi Sapta Tala (literally, “primordial seven talas”) remains in use in contemporary times.[46][48] The efforts of Purandara Dasa in the 16th century began the Carnatic style of Indian classical music.[47]

 

Saraswati is the goddess of music and knowledge in the Indian tradition.

Carnatic music, from South India, tends to be more rhythmically intensive and structured than Hindustani music. Examples of this are the logical classification of ragas into melakartas, and the use of fixed compositions similar to Western classical music. Carnatic raga elaborations are generally much faster in tempo and shorter than their equivalents in Hindustani music. In addition, accompanists have a much larger role in Carnatic concerts than in Hindustani concerts. Today’s typical concert structure was put in place by the vocalist Ariyakudi Ramanuja Iyengar. The opening piece is called a varnam, and is a warm-up for the musicians. A devotion and a request for a blessing follows, then a series of interchanges between ragams (unmetered melody) and Tanam (the ornamentation within a melorhythmic cycle, equivalent to the jor). This is intermixed with hymns called krithis. The pallavi or theme from the raga then follows. Carnatic pieces also have notated lyrical poems that are reproduced as such, possibly with embellishments and treatments according to the performer’s ideology, referred to as Manodharmam.[citation needed]

Primary themes include worship, descriptions of temples, philosophy, and nayaka-nayika (Sanskrit “hero-heroine”) themes. Tyagaraja (1759–1847), Muthuswami Dikshitar (1776–1827) and Syama Sastri (1762–1827) have been the important historic scholars of Carnatic music. According to Eleanor Zelliot, Tyagaraja is known in the Carnatic tradition as one of its greatest composers, and he reverentially acknowledged the influence of Purandara Dasa.[47]

A common belief is that Carnatic music represents a more ancient and refined approach to classical music, whereas Hindustani music has evolved by external influences.[49]

கருநாடக இசையில் வயலின்

தென்னிந்திய இசை முறைமையான கருநாடக இசையில், வயலின் தற்போது முக்கியமான கருவியாகப் பயன்படுகின்றது. இங்கு இது பாலசுவாமி தீட்சிதர் (1786 – 1858) என்பவரால் அறிமுகப்படுத்தப்பட்டதாக நம்பப்படுகின்றது. இவர் 1824 இல் எட்டயபுரம் சமஸ்தான வித்துவானாக இருந்தவர். கர்நாடக இசைக்கருவிகளை இரண்டு வகையாகப் பிரிக்கலாம். ஒன்று பண்ணிசைக் கருவிகள் (melodic instruments). மற்றொன்று தாளக் கருவிகள் (percussion instruments). ஆகும். குரலுக்கு இணையாக இராகங்களையும், மெட்டுகளையும் (tunes) இசைக்கக்கூடிய கருவிகள் பண்ணிசைக் கருவிகள், புல்லாங்குழல், நாகசுரம், வீணை, வயலின் ஆகியவை பண்ணிசைக் கருவிகள். மண்டலின், கிளாரினெட், சக்ஸோபோன் ஆகிய மேலைநாட்டுக் கருவிகளும் தற்காலத்தில் கருநாடக இசையைத் தருகின்றன. தாளத்தின் நுட்பங்களை இசை, லய நயத்துடன் வாசிக்கும் கருவிகள் தாளக்கருவிகள். கருநாடக இசையில் முதன்மையான தாளக் கருவி மிருதங்கம். தவில் என்னும் கருவி நாகசுர இசையோடு இணைந்த ஒரு தாளக் கருவியாகும். வயலின் ஒரு நரம்புக் கருவி (stringed instrument). மேலைநாட்டு இசைக்கருவி. கி.பி. 19 ஆம் நூற்றாண்டிலிருந்து கருநாடக இசையில் வயலின் ஒரு இன்றியமையாத கருவியாக உள்ளது. குரலிசைக்கு ஒப்ப எல்லா இசை நுணுக்கங்களையும் வயலினில் இசைக்கலாம். கர்நாடக இசையில் தனி நிகழ்ச்சி நிலையில் (solo concert) நல்ல வரவேற்பைப் பெற்றிருக்கிறது. பக்க இசை நிலையிலும் (accompanying instrument) இன்றியமையாத இடத்தைப் பெற்றுள்ளது .

Contact Us